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Tag: "women’s movement"

The Divine Feminine at the Parliament of the World’s Religions

by Joel Pitney

Amy EdelsteinThe following post is from Amy Edelstein, a former editor for EnlightenNext magazine, who spent the past week in Melbourne, Australia at the Parliament of the World’s Religions with Andrew Cohen and the rest of the EnlightenNext team:

From UN Millennium Development Goals to an exploration of Sri Aurobindo’s philosophy and a call for integral education to start informing our higher education systems to new visions for women of faith, the Parliament themes bombard participants at all kinds of different levels and dimensions of the mind, psyche, and self.

The session on the Divine Feminine was one that perhaps the most disturbing and confusing of all the sessions I attended or heard of. Continue reading…

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What Do Women Want? Again…

by Elizabeth Debold

Sorry about using that tired question ”what do women want?” to start off this post. Freud asked it–likening women’s consicousness to a dark continent both unexplored and presumably unknowable–and every exasperated male writer and far too many marketers have used it since. But the question is popping up again. In a recent New York Times op-ed column entitled “Liberated and Unhappy,“  Ross Douthat reports on an analysis by economists Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers that indicates that across race, marriage status, economic bracket, and even country, women’s subjective experience of being happy has declined both absolutely and in relation to men. Interestingly, in 1970–before the women’s movement so dramatically opened so many women’s life options–women were generally more happy than men. So, in the forty years since women in the West won their freedom to choose the lives that they want, they have become less happy. Fascinating, isn’t it? Continue reading…

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